MOABA Events

2017 MOABA Conference

Friday, November 17th and Saturday, November 18th

Location

Registration

Sheraton Westport Chalet Hotel St. Louis
191 Westport Plaza Drive
St. Louis, MO 63146

To take advantage of our special rate ($92/night + tax), please reserve your room by October 17, 2017

Registration ends Tuesday, November 14th
Onsite registration is subject to limited availability and additional fees
Beginning 11/17/17, there will be a $25.00 additional fee added to registration
All sales are final

Convention options
Register now
Purchase BACB CEU

Schedule

Friday, November 17th

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7:45 AM - 8:15 AM

Registration and Check in

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8:15 AM - 8:30 AM

Presidential Address

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8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

Greg Hanley

Gregory P. Hanley, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Dr. Hanley has been applying the principles of learning to improve socially important behaviors of children and adults with and without disabilities for over 25 years. He worked and trained at the Spurwink School, the Groden Center, and the Kennedy Krieger Institute, was degreed at the University of Florida, was tenured at the University of Kansas, and is currently a Professor of Psychology and Director of the Behavior Analysis Doctoral Program and the Life Skills Clinic at Western New England University and an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Hanley has published over 100 chapters and articles in peer-reviewed journals in areas such as the assessment and prevention of problem behavior, teaching programs for young children, and evidence-based values. Dr. Hanley is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 25), a past Associate Editor of The Behavior Analyst, past Editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice, and current Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.

Acknowledging essentials outcomes and all that you are willing to not know when functionally analyzing behavior

Abstract: Research has indicated that better outcomes are obtained when treatment is informed by a functional assessment process that includes a functional analysis. It is important to recognize, however, that even clear functional analysis outcomes require interpretation of the controlling variables within the analysis and inference as to whether those variables are controlling problem behavior in the various conditions in which problem behavior has been reported to occur. It is also important to recognize that there are always aspects of controlling contingencies that remain unknown even when functional analysis results are clear. The important question for the behavior analytic practitioner is: What are you willing to not know prior to treating problem behavior? In this presentation, I will describe all that which I am willing to not know and that which is essential for me to know prior to treating problem behavior.

Objective:
The attendee will be able to distinguish essential understandings from that which may be left unknown when conducting the functional analysis part of the behavioral assessment process.

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9:30 AM - 9:45 AM

Break

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9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

Ray Miltenberger

Raymond G. Miltenberger, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Raymond G. Miltenberger, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is the director of the Applied Behavior Analysis Program at the University of South Florida. He is a Fellow and past president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI). His research focuses on safety skills, health, fitness, and sports, and staff training and management. He has published over 200 journal articles and chapters and has written a behavior modification textbook, now in its sixth edition. Dr. Miltenberger has received numerous teaching and research awards including the APA Division 25 Award for Distinguished Contributions to Applied Behavioral Research and the ABAI Outstanding Mentorship Award.

Get Up and Go! Using ABA Procedures to Increase Physical Activity

This presentation will discuss the author’s recent research evaluating ABA procedures to promote physical activity with children and adults and with adults with intellectual disabilities. The presentation will discuss the importance of physical activity and issues in accurate assessment of physical activity. The presentation will then discuss research on behavioral interventions including self-monitoring, goal setting, feedback and rewards. The presentation will conclude with discussion of accessibility and implementation fidelity.

Objectives:
Describe approaches to the assessment of physical activity.
Describe interventions to increase physical activity in children.
Describe interventions to increase physical activity in adults.

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10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Florence DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA

Florence DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA

Dr. Florence DiGennaro Reed, a board certified behavior analyst, received a doctorate in school psychology from Syracuse University. She also completed a clinical post-doctoral fellowship at the Institute for Child Development and a pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology at the May Center for Education and Neurorehabilitation and the May Center for Child Development. Presently, Florence is an Associate Professor in and Chairperson of the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas where she directs the Performance Management Laboratory. Her research examines effective and efficient staff training and performance improvement practices. She also conducts translational research in on-campus laboratory facilities. Florence has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, performance management, assessment, and intervention. She has served on the editorial boards of Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of Behavioral Education, Behavior Analysis in Practice, The Psychological Record, and School Psychology Review and is an Associate Editor for Journal of Behavioral Education and Behavior Analysis in Practice. Florence is co-editor of two books published through Springer titled Handbook of Crisis Intervention for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Bridging the Gap Between Science and Practice in Autism Service Delivery.

Evidence-Based Performance Management: Applying Behavioral Science to Support Practitioners

Performance management involves the application of behavioral principles to manage the performance of staff. Despite serving as effective change agents for clients, behavior analysts often struggle with motivating and supporting the staff they supervise. This presentation will propose a three-term model for targeting staff behavior, describe evidence-based performance management procedures, and share experimental data and case studies supporting the effectiveness of a behavior analytic approach to staff training and professional development.

Learning Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to describe why targeting staff performance is important.
2. The participant will be able to identify and describe the components of behavioral skills training and an evidence-based approach to performance management of staff.
3. The participant will be able to discuss results of studies evaluating the components of behavioral skills training.

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11:45 AM - 1:15 PM

Lunch

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1:15 PM - 2:15 PM

Business Meeting

Members Only

Voting on new officers and bylaws.

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2:15 PM - 2:30 PM

Break

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2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Derek Reed, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA-KS

Derek Reed, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA-KS

Dr. Derek Reed is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas where he directs the Applied Behavioral Economics Laboratory. Derek received his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Illinois State University and his Masters and PhD in School Psychology from Syracuse University. He has served as Associate Editor for Behavior Analysis in Practice, the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and The Psychological Record, and guest Associate Editor for The Behavior Analyst, Journal of Behavioral Education, and Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Derek has published over 100 peer reviewed papers and book chapters, coauthored three edited books, and was the 2016 recipient of the American Psychological Association Division 25 B. F. Skinner Foundation New Applied Researcher Award. He is presently working on a new textbook titled “Introduction to Behavior Analysis” with his coauthors Greg Madden and Mark Reilly. Derek recently served on the as the Executive Director of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior and is presently the Coordinator of the ABAI Science Board. His research addresses issues of societal concern through behavioral science and economic theory.

The Promise of Applied Behavioral Economics: Examples from Under the Dome

Operant behavioral economics seeks to understand ways the four-term contingency is sensitive to microeconomic principles. Central to this notion is that reinforcer constraint operates on a supply-side manipulation of an organism’s “economy” of consumption. These supply-side influences are generally categorized into behavioral economic demand (i.e., persistent responding to defend baseline consumption amidst increasing costs) and discounting (diminished valuation as a function of delay or probability of receiving a reinforcer). These behavioral economic contributions to behavior analysis have yielded much success in conceptualizing drug abuse liability, resulting in advances such as contingency management and behavioral theories of addiction. Despite these successes, the application of behavioral economics to everyday human behavior – let alone ways in which such principles can be translated to vulnerable populations – remains nearly non-existent. This presentation showcases recent work from the KU Applied Behavioral Economics Laboratory, which applies behavioral economic science to issues of everyday societal concern such as sustainability, risky health decisions (e.g., unprotected sex, drug use, cancer risk behavior), distracted/impaired driving, and decision making in crisis situations such as natural disasters and severe weather. In each case, data will be provided to demonstrate ways behavioral economic approaches address behavioral issues of the average American – those under the dome of the bell curve distribution of ability.

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3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Anna Pétursdóttir, Ph.D.

Anna Ingeborg Pétursdóttir, Ph.D.

Anna Ingeborg Pétursdóttir is an associate professor of psychology at Texas Christian University (TCU) and a part-time lecturer at Reykjavik University in Iceland. Her research at TCU encompasses both basic and applied interests and focuses primarily on verbal behavior acquisition and the relationship between verbal behavior and derived stimulus relations. Dr. Petursdottir has served as the editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and an associate editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and she currently serves as an associate editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. She is also a past president of the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis.

Using Stimulus Pairing Procedures to Increase Vocalizations

It has long been hypothesized that the early cooing and babbling of infants are shaped into native-language speech sounds via auditory feedback from their own voices. In behavioral terms, vocal response products that resemble speech sounds in the infant’s environment function as reinforcers for vocalizing. Clinicians and researchers have translated this hypothesis into stimulus-stimulus pairing interventions intended to increase novel vocalizations of nonverbal children with autism and other developmental disabilities. These interventions aim to increase the reinforcing value of previously non-reinforcing speech sounds by pairing them with primary or other established reinforcers. Although the idea is conceptually sound, the literature to date has produced mixed results. In this presentation, I will discuss possible reasons for the inconsistent effects reported in the literature and provide tentative recommendations for clinicians, based on the existing literature and experience from my lab.

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4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Poster and Wine Bar

Saturday, November 18th

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8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Registration and Check in

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9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Workshop #1
Greg Hanley

Gregory P. Hanley, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Dr. Hanley has been applying the principles of learning to improve socially important behaviors of children and adults with and without disabilities for over 25 years. He worked and trained at the Spurwink School, the Groden Center, and the Kennedy Krieger Institute, was degreed at the University of Florida, was tenured at the University of Kansas, and is currently a Professor of Psychology and Director of the Behavior Analysis Doctoral Program and the Life Skills Clinic at Western New England University and an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Hanley has published over 100 chapters and articles in peer-reviewed journals in areas such as the assessment and prevention of problem behavior, teaching programs for young children, and evidence-based values. Dr. Hanley is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 25), a past Associate Editor of The Behavior Analyst, past Editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice, and current Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.

Practical Functional Assessment and Skill-Based Treatment of Severe Problem Behavior

Abstract: A number of myths regarding the functional assessment process, which appear to be pervasive within different research and practice communities, will be reviewed in the context of an efficient functional assessment process. Frequently described obstacles to implementing a critical aspect of the functional assessment process, the functional analysis, will be reviewed in the context of solutions for overcoming them. An effective, comprehensive, skill-based, and parent-validated treatment process for the problem behaviors associated with autism, which is derived from the practical functional assessment process, will then be described. This seminar will primarily be delivered via interactive lecture, but opportunities for implementation practice and discussion will also be arranged.

Objectives:
1. Given the results of an open-ended interview, the attendee should be able to design an efficient, individualized (non-standardized) and synthesized functional analysis.
2. An attendee will be able to describe several strategies for teaching individuals with severe problem behavior to tolerate both delays to and denials of reinforcers previously maintaining their problem behavior.
3. An attendee should be able to describe how compliance and leisure skills may be shaped during delays to the reinforcers that historically maintained problem behavior.

Relevant Readings:
Ghaemmaghami, M., Hanley, G. P., Jin, S., and Vanselow, N. R. (2015) Affirming control by multiple reinforcers via progressive treatment analysis. Behavioral Interventions. 31, 70-86.
Ghaemmaghami, M., Hanley, G. P., & Jessel, J. (2016). Contingencies promote delay tolerance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1002/jaba.333
Hanley, G. P. (2012). Functional assessment of problem behavior: Dispelling myths, overcoming implementation obstacles, and developing new lore. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 54-72.
Hanley, G. P., Jin, C. S., Vanselow, N. R., & Hanratty, L. A. (2014). Producing meaningful improvements in problem behavior of children with autism via synthesized analyses and treatments. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 47, 16-36.
Jessel, J., Hanley, G. P., & Ghaemmaghami, M. (2016). Interview-informed synthesized contingency analyses: Thirty replications and reanalysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1002/jaba.316
Santiago, J. L., Hanley, G. P., Moore, K., & Jin, C. S. (2016). The generality of interview-informed functional analyses: Systematic replications in school and home. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46, 797-811.
Slaton, J. D., Hanley, G. P. and Raftery, K. J. (2017). Interview-informed functional analyses: A comparison of synthesized and isolated components. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 50, 252–277.

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9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Workshop #2
Florence DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA

Florence DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA

Dr. Florence DiGennaro Reed, a board certified behavior analyst, received a doctorate in school psychology from Syracuse University. She also completed a clinical post-doctoral fellowship at the Institute for Child Development and a pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology at the May Center for Education and Neurorehabilitation and the May Center for Child Development. Presently, Florence is an Associate Professor in and Chairperson of the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas where she directs the Performance Management Laboratory. Her research examines effective and efficient staff training and performance improvement practices. She also conducts translational research in on-campus laboratory facilities. Florence has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, performance management, assessment, and intervention. She has served on the editorial boards of Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of Behavioral Education, Behavior Analysis in Practice, The Psychological Record, and School Psychology Review and is an Associate Editor for Journal of Behavioral Education and Behavior Analysis in Practice. Florence is co-editor of two books published through Springer titled Handbook of Crisis Intervention for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Bridging the Gap Between Science and Practice in Autism Service Delivery.

Using Behavioral Science to Produce Organizational Change

The purpose of this workshop is to describe a behavioral science framework and consultation model for introducing organizational change at a behavioral healthcare organization. The presenter will share real-world examples of organizational change initiatives involving a collaboration between consultants, human resources, community living staff, senior leadership, and a staff training department. To date, efforts have addressed quality assurance, staff turnover, hiring timelines, and staff training among others. The workshop will emphasize the development of staff and agency performance metrics to promote quality assurance, performance diagnostics, and change initiatives. Through hands-on and small-group activities, attendees will develop metrics and scorecards for use in their own employment settings. Moreover, attendees will receive printed materials of consultation products (e.g., quality assurance scorecards, staff training materials).

Learning Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to describe the importance of using behavioral science for organizational change and staff support.
2. The participant will be able to identify and describe a performance scorecard and performance diagnostics in a human service setting.
3. The participant will be able to develop strategies to use in their own employment settings.

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12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Lunch

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1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Workshop #3
Nic Weatherly, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Nicholas Weatherly, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Dr. Nicholas Weatherly is business and leadership consultant and an Associate
Professor in the School of Behavior Analysis at the Florida Institute of
Technology, where he also serves as chair of the Master of Arts program in
Professional Behavior Analysis. His expertise is in developing and providing
efficient training and leadership solutions designed to maximize performance and
create sustainable impact. Prior to joining Florida Tech, Dr. Weatherly was a
consultant with Aubrey Daniels International where he led their instructional
systems projects and consulted in a variety of areas of business and industry
including manufacturing, energy, banking, health insurance, and clinical services.
He has held advisory roles and served on the board of directors for a number of
professional associations, advocacy groups, and service facilities. Most recently
he serves as the President of the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts,
Past-President of the Georgia Association for Behavior Analysis, and works on
various ethics committees for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board.

OBM Tips for New and Experienced Managers and Practitioners

The success of our work as behavior analysts lies on our ability to deliver sound treatment while working within the parameters of our work environment. Each work environment offers unique clinical, managerial, and ethical challenges and many of these challenges can make or break the efficacy of your services. As a practitioner, you might need others to collect data, implement your treatment plan, or help you deliver services. For the practitioner recently promoted to a role as supervisor or manager, your scope of practice has now shifted from clinical services to managing employee performance. The purpose of this workshop is to provide new and experienced managers and practitioners helpful tips that can help enhance their application of behavior analysis to areas of performance management.

Objectives:
1. The participant will be able to identify performance-management opportunities in their workplace.
2. The participant will be able to explain ways to assess organizational performance problems.
3. The participant will be able to describe techniques to coach colleagues, parents, direct reports, and supervisors.
4. The participant will be able to provide ways that the BACB Ethics Code relates to OBM.

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1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Workshop #4
Casey Clay

Dr. Casey Clay

Dr. Casey Clay is an Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He received a Ph.D. from Utah State University in Disability Disciplines and a Master’s degree from Northeastern University in Applied Behavior Analysis. He has over 10 years of clinical experience designing and implementing ABA programs with individuals with disabilities including working at the New England Center for Children and the Utah Behavior Support Clinic. He also has published research in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), Behavior Analysis in Practice, Research in Developmental Disabilities, and Learning and Motivation, in addition he has been a guest reviewer for many of the leading journals in the field. He has taught graduate-level ethics for behavior analysts and delivered related content in trainings to private companies. His research focuses on identification of preferred and reinforcing stimuli (e.g., social interactions) and efficient skills training methodologies for clinicians and pre-service behavior analysts.

Ethics for Behavior Analysts

This workshop will cover sections from the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that went into effect January 1, 2016 and was updated July 6, 2017. Specific topics covered will include effective supervision techniques, reliance on scientific knowledge, and boundaries of competence. There will be discussion of common ethically challenging scenarios and problem solving strategies. Attendees will leave with a strengthened repertoire of ethical behavior and knowledge of standards and requirements of their field.

Convention Options

Beginning 11/17, a $25.00 additional fee has been added to registration

Friday Only

Friday Plus One Saturday Workshop

Friday Plus Two Saturday Workshops

One Saturday Workshop

Two Saturday Workshops

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